Explosivity of volcanic eruptions: current assessment methods


EXPLOSIVITY OF VOLCANIC ERUTIONS: CURRENT EVALUATION METHODS

Assessing the level of explosiveness of a volcanic eruption is a real challenge. But what are the parameters that are currently used in this regard?

Incandescent fireballs that are violently fired into the air, gigantic clouds of ash that rise into the sky, unstoppable ardent avalanches that descend from the flanks of a volcano, this set of words leads to imagine an explosive volcanic eruption, such as could happen with Vesuvius. If you turn your gaze to Stromboli, however, things change, you can always notice an explosive type of activity, but "how explosive"? Why are some volcanoes characterized by very violent explosions while others by small explosions and still others by lava flows alone? Currently some parameters are being used to clarify this question and, only recently, in addition to high improvements in the prediction and evaluation of the explosiveness of volcanic eruptions, new methods are starting to be considered.

Volcanoes are not all the same, some have explosive activity and others effusive, the latter characterized only by the emission of lava flows and / or degassing. In general, in explosive volcanism we distinguish: volcanoes with Strombolian activity, characterized by small explosions and lava fountains; Vulcan activity, given by violent explosions with launches of pyroclasts of modest size even at a great distance from the crater; plinian activity, large explosive eruptions with a column of smoke and ash that can extend up to the stratosphere and generate violent pyroclastic flows; ultraplinian activity, linked to catastrophic eruptions and immense proportions of lava material. Non-explosive eruptions are instead defined as Hawaiian. An example of a volcano with Plinian activity is given by Vesuvius, while an example of Hawaiian-type volcanism can be observed at Kīlauea (Hawaii). There is, however, an index to calculate the "power" of a volcanic eruption, the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI), which goes from 0 (for effusive eruptions) to, theoretically, infinite depending on how explosive and large a volcanic apparatus.

What, however, could immediately leave you perplexed is the fact that the same volcano behaves in a completely different way, even within a few days. This can be explained by important physico-chemical parameters that are directly related to the degree of explosiveness that a volcano can present. The main parameters are: volatile content and viscosity. Lately, the chemical interaction between magma and water and the phenomenon of magma mixing are also starting to be considered, as two potential triggers of explosive eruptions.

Volatiles consist mainly of H2O and CO2 (water and carbon dioxide) and, to a lesser extent, CO, SO2, H2S, H2, S and O, dissolved in molecular solution in magma. However, the volatiles represent only one of the three components of a magma, the other two are given by a liquid part, with a temperature between 650-1200 ° C (essentially consisting of mobile ions), and a solid part, including the crystals already formed. from the same liquid part. In general, the higher the volatile content, the more the magma is capable of generating explosive eruptions.

The viscosity of a magma represents its resistance to flow, in other words, the less viscous a magma is, the more it is "fluid and free to move". To better understand how this important parameter affects the degree of explosiveness, it is good to clarify how magma behaves at the atomic level. A magma is mainly composed of a fusion of silicates in the form of tetrahedra [SiO4] 4-, these are linked together by bridging oxygen and have a silica particle (network-forming ion) in the center, this process is called polymerization. If, to modify this atomic structure, other atoms (such as Ca and Mg) intervene, these will turn out to be bond modifiers (network-modifying ion), breaking the bridge oxygen and the entire structure, making it no longer polymerized. Therefore, in the polymerized case the viscosity is high because the magma is less inclined to flow, being well bound by the bridging oxygen (the single units are subject to a considerable internal friction), in the second case the viscosity is low due to the other atoms that upon entering the system, they destroy the previous atomic structure, making everything much more "mobile" (image 1). The low-fluid magmas, with high viscosity, are those capable of generating the largest explosive eruptions. It follows that the more a magma is rich in silica (acid magma), the more the viscosity, and therefore the explosiveness, increases. A large amount of crystals also contributes to making the magmatic melt more viscous. The viscosity also depends on the temperature and the dissolved H2O, the higher these two values ​​are, the less viscous the magma will be.


Image - 1 - Diagram showing the difference between the atomic structure of a high viscosity magma (left) and a low viscosity one (right). In the first case, the rash will be more explosive
(Credit: Alessandro Da Mommio, note 1)

Eruptions in which there is a chemical interaction between magma and H2O (both in liquid and solid state) are called phreatomagmatic. Generally, this eruptive style presents itself as immediate and highly explosive. A relatively recent example is the 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Iceland), in which the high degree of explosiveness and dispersion of the ashes was caused by the contact between the magma and the ice that covered the top of the volcano (image 2 ). From some laboratory experiments it has been observed that, depending on the water-magma ratio, the explosiveness of the eruption varies regularly: for low ratios the activity could appear as Strombolian (non-violent), while it reaches the maximum point at the water-magma ratio of 0.3, increasing the ratio even more, however, the efficiency decreases as the abundance of water will tend to completely cool the magma (as can happen in a submarine eruption).


Picture - 2 - Pheatomagmatic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 (Iceland). It is possible to note how the magma-ice interaction plays an important role in the level of explosiveness of an eruption
(Credit: Patrick Mylund Nielsen, note 2)

Magma mixing phenomena consist in the mixing of two or more magmas of different chemical composition and thermodynamic state such as to form a hybrid magma, having intermediate properties between the previous ones. The entry into the magmatic system of a new magma, not in thermodynamic equilibrium with the one already present in the magma chamber of the volcano, creates a general state of imbalance in the crystals already present, which must therefore "reprogram" and continue the process of crystallization under new conditions. Only recently it is being considered how magma mixing processes can make an eruption more explosive than normal, in particular for the concept according to which this contact between two different thermodynamic states increases the heat movements (convective motions) in the magma chamber. and this, in turn, increases the volatile content which, as explained above, increases explosiveness.

The parameters that play a fundamental role in the explosiveness and eruptive style of a volcano can therefore be summarized in a high volatile content and high viscosity of the magma, to which, according to certain situations, contact between magma-H2O and magma phenomena can be added. mixing. The same volcano can exhibit different activity depending on how these physicochemical and geochemical parameters change in the magmatic system. If, with future studies and research on these important parameters and methods, it will one day be possible to establish how long it takes for a volcano to erupt in a highly explosive way, then we will achieve great progress in forecasting volcanic hazard and risk.

dr. Nicola Mari

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
Newhall, C. G. and Self, S. The volcanic explosivity index (VEI): An estimate of explosive magnitude for historical volcanism, J. Geophys. Res, 87, 1231-1238, 1982.

Sheridan, M.F. and Wohletz, K ... Hydrovolcanism, basic considerations and review. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 17: 1—29, 1983.

SITOGRAPHY:
1. Alex Strekeisen
2. Eyjafjallajokull eruption photo

-R.A. F. Cas and J.V. Wright (1986) Vulcanic successions

- J. Mcphie M. Doyle & R. Allen Volcanic Textures

- Sigmursson et., All (1999-2015) Encyclopedia of Volcanoes, 1st / 2nd Edition

- Timothy H. Druitt, B. Peter Kokelaar The Eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, from 1995. Edition 21

- R. Scandone and L. Giacomelli. Volcanology. Liguori Publisher (2004)

The main knowledge acquired will be:

- knowledge of the mechanisms of magma formation within the Earth

- Transport and deposition mechanisms

- knowledge of the classification systems of igneous rocks

- Physical characteristics of magmas

- knowledge of the main types of volcanism

- Knowledge of components, textures and structures in volcanic deposits

- Knowledge of lavas and related deposits

- Knowledge of pyroclastic flows and related deposits

-Knowledge of secondary volcanic processes after eruption

The main skills (i.e. the ability to apply the knowledge acquired) will be:

- to classify igneous rocks via macroscopic samples and thin sections

- knowing how to frame the different types of igneous rocks within different volcanic systems.

- Knowing how to frame the effusive and explosive volcanic eruptions and know the processes that determine the change of eruptive style and the mechanisms of placement

The exam includes an oral test.

The oral exam consists of a discussion lasting about 30 minutes aimed at ascertaining the level of knowledge and understanding reached by the student on the theoretical and methodological contents indicated in the program.

The oral test will also allow to verify the student's communication skills with language properties and autonomous organization of the exhibition

on the same theoretical topics.


Academic year 2020/2021

At the end of the course, the student has acquired skills on the study of volcanic deposits and morphologies and their stratigraphy to allow the reconstruction of the internal structure of volcanic buildings and to interpret the main eruptive and post-eruptive processes, as essential inputs for volcanology analysis. physics and modeling, hazard and volcanic risk assessments, resource research and territorial and geo-cultural planning. In particular, the student is able to: • describe the volcanic deposits (volcanoclastic and lava) and interpret the eruptive processes that determined their formation • recognize the volcanic morphologies and volcano-tectonic collapse based on the evaluation of the morphological factor and the interaction between tectonics and eruptive activity • identify the discontinuity surfaces that characterize the volcanic successions and use them as fundamental instruments of correlation and stratigraphic classification • define the temporal development of the eruptive activity in recent and / or ancient volcanoes and the recurrence of eruptions for the of volcanic hazard and risk assessments • know the main stratigraphic, petrological and geophysical techniques necessary for the reconstruction of the internal structure of volcanoes and their potential in terms of georesources


Explosivity of volcanic eruptions: current assessment methods

2) Geology of volcanic areas: survey and study methodology, stratigraphy, U.B.S.U. Regional description and analysis of the genesis and evolution of volcanism in different geodynamic regimes. Evaluation of the hazard in a volcanic environment.

3) geological campaign in volcanic areas with geological survey exercises and main examples of what was discussed in class.

Prerequisites

Knowledge of stratigraphy, geological survey, structural geology and petrography

Didactic method

course in Italian in-depth material and study in English.

28 hours of lectures and 6 days of countryside (generally on Etna)

Teaching materials

PDF of powerpoint presentations

introductory book to volcanology, Karoly Nemeth and Ulrike Martin, Practical Volcanology

Probably recorded videos of the lectures

Teaching period

Methods of verification of profit and evaluation

Discussion interview on the campaign work and on the topics covered in class

Reception hours

The aim is to provide students with the basic knowledge to realize a field work in volcanic areas

Contents

Detailed program

Prerequisites

Knowledge of stratigraphy, field survey, structural geology and petrography

Teaching form

Lessons in italian, but papers are in english

28 hours of lessons and 6 days of field work (generally on Mt. Etna)

Textbook and teaching resource

PDF files from my powerpoints

Karoly Nemeth and Ulrike Martin, Practical Volcanology

Probably movies of each lesson

Semester

Assessment method

Oral discussion on the field work and on the topics introduced during the lessons

Office hours

Usually on Monday, 15.30 to 16.30. Please ask for a confirmation by e-mail

The manual enrolments plugin allows users to be enrolled manually via a link in the course administration settings, by a user with appropriate permissions such as a teacher. The plugin should normally be enabled, since certain other enrollment plugins, such as self enrollment, require it.

The self enrollment plugin allows users to choose which courses they want to participate in. The courses may be protected by an enrollment key. Internally the enrollment is done via the manual enrollment plugin which has to be enabled in the same course.


VOLCANOLOGY: CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS

Basic knowledge of physics, chemistry, geology, igneous petrology, geochemistry, geodynamics

Provide basic knowledge on volcanism, on the processes of formation, upwelling of magmas and on the mechanisms of eruption and placing the place of volcanic products useful for the development of a course of study in Earth Sciences. To confer skills (methods and study strategies) useful for recognition on the ground and for the characterization in the laboratory of the different types of products and their physical properties and their chemical and mineralogical composition.

Volcanic structures and eruptions, Distribution of volcanoes on planet earth and relations with geodynamics, Definition of magma, Chemical composition and physical properties of magmas, Formation and ascent of magmas, Eruptive styles, Classification of eruptions and study methods. Products of effusive eruptions. Products of explosive eruptions. Volcaniclastic deposits. Tephrostratigraphy. Volcanic monitoring. The volcanic hazard, Notes on the volcanic risk. Impact of volcanic eruptions, Italian volcanoes

Lesson Topic
1 Introduction, course description
2 Definition of volcanic structures and eruptions
3 Definition of volcanic structures and eruptions
4 Distribution of volcanoes on planet earth and relations with geodynamics
5 Definition of magma, chemical composition and physical properties of magmas
6 Volcanic gases
7 Formation and ascent of magmas
8 Eruptive styles
9 Classification of eruptions and methods of study
10 Products of effusive eruptions - Generalities and study methods
11 Products of effusive eruptions - Morphology and structural characteristics
12 Laboratory-Textural observations under the optical microscope
13 Laboratory-Textural observations using a scanning electron microscope
14 Products of explosive eruptions - Generalities and study methods
15 Pyroclastic fallout deposits
16 Relapse pyroclastic deposits
16 Flow pyroclastic deposits
17 Flow pyroclastic deposits
17 Laboratory-Sedimentological characterization and components of explosive eruption products
18 Laboratory-Textural observations using a scanning electron microscope
19 Volcaniclastic deposits: lahars and debris flows
20 Tephrostratigraphy: generalities and methods
21 Tephrostratigraphy: importance of volcanic levels for stratigraphic correlations and for paleoenvironmental reconstructions.
21 Volcanic monitoring: generalities and strategies
22 Volcanic monitoring: observations and measurements
23 Volcanic monitoring: geophysical methods
24 Volcanic monitoring: geochemical methods
25 Volcanic monitoring: examples of some recent eruptions
26 The volcanic hazard: generality
27 Volcanic hazard: methods for assessment
28 Notes on volcanic risk assessment
29 Impact of volcanic eruptions on society and ecosystems
30 Impact of volcanic eruptions on society
31 The Italian volcanoes
32 The Italian volcanoes
33 The Italian volcanoes
34-48 Excursions on the ground

Volcanoes and eruptions. Giacomelli and Scandone
Published by Pitagora 2002, 288 pp,

The Encyclopedia of Volcanoes - 2nd Edition - Elsevier Editors: Haraldur Sigurdsson Bruce Houghton Steve McNutt Hazel Rymer John Stix
eBook ISBN: 9780123859396
Hardcover ISBN: 9780123859389


The Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC

Climate News Network has prepared this much abbreviated version of the first part of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) to serve as an objective guide to some of the key issues it covers. It is in no way an assessment of what the Summary says: the wording is that of the IPCC authors themselves, except for a few cases where we have added titles.

A note from the editors of the Climate News Network: We have prepared this much abbreviated version of the first part of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) to serve as an objective guide to some of the key issues it covers. It is in no way an assessment of what the Summary says: the wording is that of the IPCC authors themselves, except for a few cases where we have added titles. AR5 uses a different basis as input for the models from that used in its 2007 predecessor, AR4: instead of emission scenarios, it talks about RCP, representative concentration paths. So it is not possible everywhere to make a direct comparison between AR4 and AR5, although the text does in some cases, and at the end we provide a very short list of the conclusions of the two reports on several key points. The language of science can be complex. The following is the language of the IPCC scientists. In the following days and weeks we will report in more detail on some of their findings.

In this Summary for Policymakers, the following summary terms are used to describe the evidence available: limited, medium, or robust, and for the degree of agreement: low, medium, or high. A confidence level is expressed using five qualifiers: very low, low, medium, high and very high and written in italics, for example medium confidence. For a given evidence and agreement statement, different levels of confidence can be assigned, but increasing levels of evidence and degrees of agreement correlate with increased confidence. In this summary, the following terms have been used to indicate the estimated probability of an outcome or outcome: 99-100% virtually certain probability, 90-100% very likely, 66-100% likely, and not 33-66 likely %, unlikely 0–33%, very unlikely 0–10%, exceptionally unlikely 0–1%. Where appropriate, additional terms may also be used (extremely likely: 95–100%, more likely than not> 50–100%, and extremely unlikely 0–5%).

Changes observed in the climate system

The atmosphere

The warming of the climate system is unambiguous and, since the 1950s, many of the changes observed are unprecedented for decades to millennia. The atmosphere and the ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have decreased, sea levels have risen, and greenhouse gas concentrations have risen

The economic bubble could burst for the fossil fuel giants

Each of the past three decades has been successively warmer on the Earth's surface than any previous decade since 1850.

For the longest period in which the calculation of regional trends is sufficiently complete (1901-2012), almost the entire globe has experienced surface warming.

In addition to robust multi-decadal warming, global mean surface temperature shows substantial decadal and interannual variability. Due to natural variability, trends based on short records are very sensitive to start and end dates and generally do not reflect long-term climate trends.

For example, the warming rate of the past 15 years, which begins with a strong El Niño, is lower than the rate calculated from 1951.

Changes in many extreme weather and climate events have been observed since about 1950. It is very likely that the number of cold days and nights has decreased and the number of warm days and nights has increased on a global scale

How the western fire season of 2020 has become so extreme

The Ocean

Ocean warming dominates the increase in stored energy in the climate system, accounting for over 90% of the energy stored between 1971 and 2010 (high security). It is virtually certain that the upper ocean (0-700m) warmed from 1971 to 2010 and probably warmed between 1870 and 1971.

On a global scale, ocean warming is greatest near the surface and the upper 75m warmed by 0.11 [0.09 to 0.13] ° C per decade over the period 1971-2010. Since AR4, instrumental biases in higher ocean temperature records have been identified and reduced, increasing confidence in the assessment of change.

It is likely that the ocean warmed between 700 and 2000 m from 1957 to 2009. Sufficient observations are available for the period from 1992 to 2005 for an overall assessment of the temperature change below 2000 m. There were probably no significant temperature trends observed between 2000 and 3000 m for this period. It is likely that the ocean warmed from 3,000 m to the bottom by this time, with the largest warming observed in the Southern Ocean.

More than 60% of the net energy increase in the climate system is stored in the upper ocean (0-700m) during the relatively well sampled 40 period from 1971 to 2010, and about 30% is stored in the ocean below 700m . The increase in the heat content of the upper ocean during this time period estimated by a linear trend is likely.

The cryosphere

Over the past two decades, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost mass, glaciers have continued to shrink almost worldwide, and the Northern Hemisphere's Arctic snowpack and spring snowfall have continued to decline to an extent ( high security).

Sales of Australian electric cars tripled last year. Here's what we can do to make them grow

The average rate of ice loss from the Greenland ice sheet has most likely increased significantly. in the period 1992-2001. The average rate of ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet has likely increased. in the period 1992-2001. It is very likely that these losses are mainly from the Northern Antarctic Peninsula and the Amundsen Sea sector in West Antarctica.

There is great confidence that permafrost temperatures have risen in most regions since the early 1980s. The observed warming was up to 3 ° C in parts of northern Alaska (from the early 1980s to mid-2000s) and up to 2 ° C. ° C in parts of Russian Northern Europe (1971-2010). In the latter region, a notable reduction in permafrost thickness and areal extension was observed in the period 1975-2005 (medium confidence).

Multiple lines of evidence support very consistent Arctic warming since the early 20th century.

Sea level rise

The rate of sea level rise since the mid-19th century has been higher than the average rate over the previous two millennia (high confidence). In the period 1901-2010, the global mean sea level rose by 0.19 [0.17 to 0.21] m.

Since the early 1970s, mass loss of glaciers and thermal expansion of oceans from warming together account for 75% of the observed mean sea level rise (high confidence). In the period 1993-2010, global sea level rise is, with high confidence, consistent with the sum of the observed contributions from ocean thermal expansion due to warming, glacier changes, the Greenland ice sheet, of the Antarctic ice sheet and land water Conservation.

Carbon and other biogeochemical cycles

Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane and nitrous oxide have increased to unprecedented levels in the past 800,000 years. CO2 concentrations have increased by 40% since pre-industrial times, mainly from fossil fuel emissions and secondarily from net land use emissions. The ocean has absorbed about 30% of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide emitted, causing ocean acidification

From 1750 to 2011, CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production released 365 [335 to 395] GtC [gigatons - one gigaton equal to 1,000,000,000 metrics] into the atmosphere, while deforestation and other usage changes of the soil released 180 [100 to 260] GtC.

Of these cumulative anthropogenic CO2 emissions, 240 [230 to 250] GtC accumulated in the atmosphere, 155 [125 to 185] GtC were detected from the ocean, and 150 [60 to 240] GtC accumulated in natural terrestrial ecosystems .

Climate change driver

Total natural RF [radiative forcing - the difference between the energy received by the Earth and that it radiates into space] from changes in solar irradiation and stratospheric volcanic aerosols has made only a small contribution to net radiative forcing over the last century , except for short periods after major volcanic eruptions.

Understanding the climate system and its recent changes

Compared to AR4, more detailed and longer observations and improved climate models now allow the attribution of a human contribution to detected changes in multiple components of the climate system.

Human influence on the climate system is clear. This is evident from the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, positive radiative forcing, observed warming and understanding of the climate system.

Evaluation of climate models

Climate models have improved since AR4. The models reproduce surface temperature patterns and trends observed on a continental scale over many decades, including the most rapid warming since the 20th century and cooling immediately following large volcanic eruptions (very high safety).

Long-term climate model simulations show a trend in global mean surface temperature
from 1951 to 2012 which agrees with the observed trend (very high security). There are, however, differences between simulated and observed trends over short periods such as 10 to 15 years (e.g. 1998 to 2012).

The observed reduction in the pattern of surface warming over the period 1998-2012 compared to the period 1951-2012 is due in approximately equal measure to a reduced trend in radiative forcing and a cooling contribution from internal variability, which includes a possible redistribution of heat within the ocean (medium confidence). The reduced trend of radiative forcing is mainly due to volcanic eruptions and the timing of the descending phase of the year 11 solar cycle.

Climate models now include more cloud and aerosol processes and their interactions than at the time of AR4, but confidence in the representation and quantification of these processes in the models remains low.

Climate sensitivity to equilibrium quantifies the response of the climate system to a constant radiative forcing over multi-century time scales. It is defined as the change in global mean surface temperature at equilibrium caused by doubling the atmospheric concentration of CO2.

The sensitivity to the equilibrium climate is probably between 1.5 ° C and 4.5 ° C (high confidence), extremely unlikely less than 1 ° C (high confidence) and very unlikely above 6 ° C (medium confidence). The lower temperature limit of the probable range evaluated is therefore below 2 ° C in the AR4, but the upper limit is the same. This rating reflects a better understanding, the extended record of temperature in the atmosphere and ocean, and
new estimates of the radiative forcing.

Detection and attribution of climate change

Human influence has been detected in atmospheric and ocean warming, changes in the global water cycle, reductions in snow and ice, global sea level rise, and changes in certain climatic extremes. This evidence for human flu has grown since AR4. It is extremely likely that human flu has been the main cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century.

È estremamente probabile che più della metà dell'aumento osservato della temperatura superficiale media globale da 1951 a 2010 sia stata causata dall'aumento antropogenico delle concentrazioni di gas serra e di altre forzanti antropogeniche. La migliore stima del contributo indotto dall'uomo al riscaldamento è simile al riscaldamento osservato in questo periodo.

Futuro cambiamento climatico globale e regionale

Le emissioni continue di gas a effetto serra causeranno ulteriore riscaldamento e cambiamenti in tutti i componenti del sistema climatico. Limitare i cambiamenti climatici richiederà riduzioni sostanziali e sostenute delle emissioni di gas serra.

L'oceano globale continuerà a scaldarsi durante il 21st secolo. Il calore penetra dalla superficie all'oceano profondo e influenza la circolazione oceanica.

È molto probabile che la copertura di ghiaccio del Mare Artico continuerà a ridursi e assottigliarsi e che la copertura nevosa primaverile dell'emisfero nord diminuirà durante il 21st secolo man mano che la temperatura media globale della superficie aumenta. Il volume globale del ghiacciaio diminuirà ulteriormente.

Il livello medio globale del mare continuerà a salire durante il 21st secolo. Sotto tutti gli scenari RCP il tasso di innalzamento del livello del mare molto probabilmente supererà quello osservato durante 1971-2010 a causa dell'aumento del riscaldamento degli oceani e dell'aumento della perdita di massa da parte dei ghiacciai e delle calotte glaciali.

L'innalzamento del livello del mare non sarà uniforme. Entro la fine del 21st secolo, è molto probabile che il livello del mare aumenti di oltre il 95% della superficie oceanica. A proposito di 70% delle coste mondiali si prevede di sperimentare un cambiamento del livello del mare entro il 20% della variazione globale del livello del mare.

I cambiamenti climatici influenzeranno i processi del ciclo del carbonio in un modo che aggraverà l'aumento di CO2 nell'atmosfera (alta sicurezza). Un ulteriore assorbimento di carbonio da parte dell'oceano aumenterà l'acidificazione degli oceani.

Le emissioni cumulative di CO2 determinano in gran parte il riscaldamento superficiale medio globale entro la fine del 21st secolo e oltre. La maggior parte degli aspetti dei cambiamenti climatici permangono per molti secoli anche se le emissioni di CO2 vengono interrotte. Questo rappresenta un sostanziale impegno multi-secolo sui cambiamenti climatici creato dalle emissioni passate, presenti e future di CO2.

Una grande parte del cambiamento climatico antropogenico derivante dalle emissioni di CO2 è irreversibile su una scala temporale plurisecolare o millenaria, tranne nel caso di una grande rimozione netta di CO2 dall'atmosfera per un periodo prolungato.

Le temperature della superficie rimarranno approssimativamente costanti a livelli elevati per molti secoli dopo una completa cessazione delle emissioni antropogeniche di CO2. A causa delle lunghe scale temporali di trasferimento di calore dalla superficie dell'oceano alla profondità, il riscaldamento dell'oceano continuerà per secoli. A seconda dello scenario, circa 15 a 40% di CO2 emessa rimarrà nell'atmosfera più a lungo degli anni 1,000.

Una perdita di massa sostenuta da strati di ghiaccio causerebbe un innalzamento del livello del mare più ampio e una parte della perdita di massa potrebbe essere irreversibile. Vi è un'elevata certezza che il riscaldamento prolungato superiore a qualche soglia porterebbe alla quasi completa perdita della calotta glaciale della Groenlandia nel corso di un millennio o più, provocando un innalzamento medio del livello medio del mare fino a 7 m.

Le stime correnti indicano che la soglia è maggiore di circa 1 ° C (bassa confidenza) ma inferiore a circa 4 ° C (media affidabilità) del riscaldamento globale rispetto al preindustriale. È possibile una brusca e irreversibile perdita di ghiaccio da una potenziale instabilità dei settori marittimi della calotta di ghiaccio antartico in risposta al forzante climatico, ma le prove e la comprensione attuali non sono sufficienti per effettuare una valutazione quantitativa.

Sono stati proposti metodi che mirano a modificare deliberatamente il sistema climatico per contrastare il cambiamento climatico, chiamato geoingegneria. Prove limitate precludono una valutazione quantitativa completa sia della Solar Radiation Management (SRM) che della rimozione dell'anidride carbonica (CDR) e del loro impatto sul sistema climatico.

I metodi CDR hanno limiti biogeochimici e tecnologici al loro potenziale su scala globale. Non c'è una conoscenza sufficiente per quantificare quante emissioni di CO2 potrebbero essere parzialmente compensate dal CDR in un periodo di tempo di un secolo.

La modellazione indica che i metodi SRM, se realizzabili, hanno il potenziale per compensare sostanzialmente un aumento della temperatura globale, ma potrebbero anche modificare il ciclo globale dell'acqua e non ridurre l'acidificazione degli oceani.

Se l'SRM fosse terminato per qualsiasi motivo, vi è un'alta probabilità che le temperature superficiali globali aumenterebbero molto rapidamente a valori coerenti con la forzatura dei gas serra. I metodi CDR e SRM portano effetti collaterali e conseguenze a lungo termine su scala globale.

Modifiche da 2007 Then and Now

Probabile aumento di temperatura di 2100: 1.5-4 ° C nella maggior parte degli scenari - da 1.8-4 ° C
Aumento del livello del mare: molto probabilmente più veloce che tra 1971 e 2010 - di 28-43 cm
Il ghiaccio marino artico estivo scompare: molto probabilmente continuerà a ridursi e ad assottigliarsi - nella seconda metà del secolo
Aumento delle ondate di calore: molto probabile che si verifichi più frequentemente e duri più a lungo - aumenta molto probabilmente


Il quinto rapporto di valutazione dell'IPCC

Climate News Network ha preparato questa versione molto abbreviata della prima parte del quinto rapporto di valutazione dell'IPCC (AR5) per servire da guida obiettiva ad alcune delle questioni principali che copre. Non è in alcun modo una valutazione di ciò che dice il Riassunto: la formulazione è quella degli stessi autori dell'IPCC, tranne alcuni casi in cui abbiamo aggiunto titoli.

Una nota dagli editori di Climate News Network: abbiamo preparato questa versione molto abbreviata della prima parte del quinto rapporto di valutazione dell'IPCC (AR5) per servire da guida obiettiva ad alcune delle questioni principali che copre. Non è in alcun modo una valutazione di ciò che dice il Riassunto: la formulazione è quella degli stessi autori dell'IPCC, tranne alcuni casi in cui abbiamo aggiunto titoli. AR5 utilizza una base diversa come input per i modelli da quello utilizzato nel suo predecessore 2007, AR4: al posto degli scenari di emissione, parla di RCP, percorsi di concentrazione rappresentativi. Quindi non è possibile ovunque fare un confronto diretto tra AR4 e AR5, anche se il testo lo fa in alcuni casi, e alla fine forniamo un elenco molto breve delle conclusioni dei due rapporti su diversi punti chiave. Il linguaggio della scienza può essere complesso. Quello che segue è il linguaggio degli scienziati dell'IPCC. Nei giorni e nelle settimane seguenti riferiremo più dettagliatamente su alcune delle loro scoperte.

In questo Riepilogo per i responsabili delle politiche, vengono utilizzati i seguenti termini di riepilogo per descrivere le prove disponibili: limitato, medio o robusto e per il grado di accordo: basso, medio o alto. Un livello di confidenza viene espresso utilizzando cinque qualificatori: molto basso, basso, medio, alto e molto alto e scritto in corsivo, ad esempio confidenza media. Per una data evidenza e dichiarazione di accordo, possono essere assegnati diversi livelli di confidenza, ma livelli crescenti di evidenza e gradi di accordo sono correlati con l'aumento della fiducia. In questo riepilogo sono stati utilizzati i seguenti termini per indicare la probabilità valutata di un esito o di un risultato: probabilità virtualmente certa del 99-100%, molto probabile 90-100%, probabile 66-100%, probabile quanto non 33-66 %, improbabile 0–33%, molto improbabile 0–10%, eccezionalmente improbabile 0–1%. Quando appropriato, possono essere utilizzati anche termini aggiuntivi (estremamente probabile: 95–100%, più probabile che non> 50–100% ed estremamente improbabile 0–5%).

Cambiamenti osservati nel sistema climatico

L'atmosfera

Il riscaldamento del sistema climatico è inequivocabile e, a partire dagli 1950, molti dei cambiamenti osservati sono senza precedenti da decenni a millenni. L'atmosfera e l'oceano si sono riscaldati, le quantità di neve e ghiaccio sono diminuite, il livello del mare è aumentato e le concentrazioni di gas a effetto serra sono aumentate

Che cosa dicono gli scienziati leader di cui dovresti sapere il rapporto sul clima spaventoso di oggi

Ognuno degli ultimi tre decenni è stato successivamente più caldo sulla superficie terrestre rispetto a qualsiasi decennio precedente da 1850.

Per il periodo più lungo in cui il calcolo delle tendenze regionali è sufficientemente completo (1901-2012), quasi l'intero globo ha subito un riscaldamento superficiale.

Oltre al robusto riscaldamento multi-decadale, la temperatura superficiale media globale mostra una sostanziale variabilità decennale e interannuale. A causa della variabilità naturale, le tendenze basate sui record brevi sono molto sensibili alle date di inizio e di fine e in generale non riflettono le tendenze climatiche a lungo termine.

Ad esempio, il tasso di riscaldamento degli ultimi 15 anni, che inizia con un forte El Niño, è inferiore al tasso calcolato da 1951.

Modifiche in molti eventi meteorologici e climatici estremi sono state osservate da circa 1950. È molto probabile che il numero di giorni e notti fredde sia diminuito e il numero di giorni e notti caldi sia aumentato su scala globale

Le emissioni irreversibili di un punto di non ritorno del permafrost

The Ocean

Il riscaldamento dell'oceano domina l'aumento di energia immagazzinata nel sistema climatico, rappresentando oltre il 90% dell'energia accumulata tra 1971 e 2010 (alta sicurezza). È virtualmente certo che l'oceano superiore (0-700 m) si è riscaldato da 1971 a 2010 e probabilmente si è riscaldato tra gli 1870 e 1971.

Su scala globale, il riscaldamento dell'oceano è maggiore vicino alla superficie e il 75 superiore m riscaldato da 0.11 [0.09 a 0.13] ° C per decennio nel periodo 1971-2010. Dal momento che AR4, i pregiudizi strumentali nei record di temperatura degli oceani superiori sono stati identificati e ridotti, aumentando la fiducia nella valutazione del cambiamento.

È probabile che l'oceano si sia riscaldato tra 700 e 2000 m da 1957 a 2009. Sono disponibili sufficienti osservazioni per il periodo da 1992 a 2005 per una valutazione globale del cambiamento di temperatura sotto 2000 m. Probabilmente non ci sono stati significativi trend di temperatura osservati tra 2000 e 3000 m per questo periodo. È probabile che l'oceano si sia riscaldato da 3000 m al fondo per questo periodo, con il più grande riscaldamento osservato nell'Oceano Antartico.

Più del 60% dell'aumento di energia netta nel sistema climatico è immagazzinato nell'oceano superiore (0-700 m) durante il periodo di 40 relativamente ben campionato da 1971 a 2010, e circa 30% è immagazzinato nell'oceano sotto 700 m. L'aumento del contenuto di calore dell'oceano superiore durante questo periodo di tempo stimato da una tendenza lineare è probabile.

La criosfera

Negli ultimi due decenni, le calotte glaciali della Groenlandia e dell'Antartide hanno perso massa, i ghiacciai hanno continuato a ridursi quasi in tutto il mondo e il manto nevoso artico e l'innevamento primaverile dell'emisfero settentrionale hanno continuato a diminuire in misura (alta sicurezza).

Il risparmio di ozono può rallentare il tasso di riscaldamento globale

Molto probabilmente il tasso medio di perdita di ghiaccio dalla calotta glaciale della Groenlandia è notevolmente aumentato . nel periodo 1992-2001. Il tasso medio di perdita di ghiaccio dalla calotta antartica è probabilmente aumentato . nel periodo 1992-2001. È molto probabile che tali perdite siano principalmente dalla penisola antartica settentrionale e dal settore del Mare di Amundsen nell'Antartide occidentale.

C'è una grande sicurezza che le temperature del permafrost siano aumentate nella maggior parte delle regioni dai primi 1980. Il riscaldamento osservato era fino a 3 ° C in parti dell'Alaska settentrionale (dai primi 1980 fino a metà 2000) e fino a 2 ° C in parti del Nord Europa russo (1971-2010). Nell'ultima regione, è stata osservata una notevole riduzione dello spessore del permafrost e dell'estensione areale nel periodo 1975-2005 (media confidenza).

Molteplici linee di prove supportano il riscaldamento artico molto consistente sin dal 20esimo secolo.

Innalzamento del livello del mare

Il tasso di innalzamento del livello del mare a partire dalla metà del 19esimo secolo è stato maggiore del tasso medio nei precedenti due millenni (alta fiducia). Nel periodo 1901-2010, il livello medio globale del mare è salito di 0.19 [0.17 a 0.21] m.

Sin dai primi 1970, la perdita di massa dei ghiacciai e l'espansione termica degli oceani dal riscaldamento insieme spiegano il 75% dell'aumento del livello medio del mare osservato (alta confidenza). Nel periodo 1993-2010, l'innalzamento globale del livello del mare è, con alta confidenza, coerente con la somma dei contributi osservati dall'espansione termica dell'oceano a causa del riscaldamento, dai cambiamenti dei ghiacciai, della calotta glaciale della Groenlandia, della calotta antartica e dell'acqua di terra Conservazione.

Carbonio e altri cicli biogeochimici

Le concentrazioni atmosferiche di anidride carbonica (CO2), metano e protossido di azoto sono aumentate fino a livelli senza precedenti negli ultimi 800,000 anni. Le concentrazioni di CO2 sono aumentate del 40% sin dai tempi preindustriali, principalmente da emissioni di combustibili fossili e secondariamente da emissioni nette di emissioni di uso del suolo. L'oceano ha assorbito circa il 30% dell'anidride carbonica antropogenica emessa, causando l'acidificazione degli oceani

Da 1750 a 2011, le emissioni di CO2 dalla combustione di combustibili fossili e la produzione di cemento hanno rilasciato 365 [335 a 395] GtC [gigatonnellate - una gigatona uguale a 1,000,000,000 metriche] nell'atmosfera, mentre la deforestazione e altri cambiamenti di uso del suolo hanno rilasciato 180 [100 a 260] GtC.

Di queste emissioni antropogeniche di CO2 cumulative, 240 [230 a 250] GtC si sono accumulate nell'atmosfera, 155 [125 a 185] GtC sono state rilevate dall'oceano e 150 [60 a 240] GtC si sono accumulate in ecosistemi terrestri naturali.

Driver del cambiamento climatico

La totale RF naturale [forzatura radiativa - la differenza tra l'energia ricevuta dalla Terra e quella che irradia nello spazio] dai cambiamenti di irradiazione solare e dagli aerosol vulcanici stratosferici ha apportato solo un piccolo contributo alla forzatura radiativa netta nel corso dell'ultimo secolo, tranne per brevi periodi dopo grandi eruzioni vulcaniche.

Comprensione del sistema climatico e dei suoi cambiamenti recenti

Rispetto a AR4, osservazioni più dettagliate e più lunghe e modelli climatici migliorati ora consentono l'attribuzione di un contributo umano ai cambiamenti rilevati in più componenti del sistema climatico.

L'influenza umana sul sistema climatico è chiara. Ciò è evidente dalle crescenti concentrazioni di gas serra nell'atmosfera, forzatura radiativa positiva, riscaldamento osservato e comprensione del sistema climatico.

Valutazione dei modelli climatici

I modelli climatici sono migliorati da quando AR4. I modelli riproducono i modelli e le tendenze della temperatura superficiale osservati su scala continentale per molti decenni, compreso il riscaldamento più rapido a partire dal 20esimo secolo e il raffreddamento immediatamente successivo a grandi eruzioni vulcaniche (altissima sicurezza).

Le simulazioni del modello climatico a lungo termine mostrano una tendenza della temperatura superficiale media globale
da 1951 a 2012 che concorda con la tendenza osservata (altissima sicurezza). Vi sono, tuttavia, differenze tra le tendenze simulate e osservate su periodi brevi come 10 a 15 anni (es. 1998 a 2012).

La riduzione osservata dell'andamento del riscaldamento superficiale nel periodo 1998-2012 rispetto al periodo 1951-2012, è dovuta in misura approssimativamente uguale a una tendenza ridotta nel forzante radiativo e un contributo di raffreddamento dalla variabilità interna, che include una possibile ridistribuzione del calore all'interno dell'oceano (media confidenza). La ridotta tendenza del forzante radiativo è principalmente dovuta alle eruzioni vulcaniche e ai tempi della fase discendente del ciclo solare dell'anno 11.

I modelli climatici ora includono più processi di cloud e aerosol e le loro interazioni, che al momento dell'AR4, ma rimane bassa la fiducia nella rappresentazione e quantificazione di questi processi nei modelli.

La sensibilità al clima all'equilibrio quantifica la risposta del sistema climatico a un costante forzante radiativo su scale temporali multi-secolo. È definito come la variazione della temperatura superficiale media globale all'equilibrio causata dal raddoppio della concentrazione atmosferica di CO2.

La sensibilità al clima di equilibrio è probabilmente compresa tra 1.5 ° C e 4.5 ° C (alta confidenza), estremamente improbabile meno di 1 ° C (alta confidenza) e molto improbabile superiore a 6 ° C (media confidenza). Il limite di temperatura inferiore dell'intervallo probabile valutato è quindi inferiore a 2 ° C nell'AR4, ma il limite superiore è lo stesso. Questa valutazione riflette una migliore comprensione, il record esteso di temperatura nell'atmosfera e nell'oceano, e
nuove stime del forzante radiativo.

Rilevazione e attribuzione dei cambiamenti climatici

L'influenza umana è stata rilevata nel riscaldamento dell'atmosfera e dell'oceano, nei cambiamenti del ciclo idrico globale, nelle riduzioni della neve e del ghiaccio, nell'innalzamento globale del livello del mare e nei cambiamenti in alcuni estremi climatici. Questa evidenza per l'influenza umana è cresciuta da quando AR4. È estremamente probabile che l'influenza umana sia stata la causa principale del riscaldamento osservato sin dalla metà del 20 secolo.

È estremamente probabile che più della metà dell'aumento osservato della temperatura superficiale media globale da 1951 a 2010 sia stata causata dall'aumento antropogenico delle concentrazioni di gas serra e di altre forzanti antropogeniche. La migliore stima del contributo indotto dall'uomo al riscaldamento è simile al riscaldamento osservato in questo periodo.

Futuro cambiamento climatico globale e regionale

Le emissioni continue di gas a effetto serra causeranno ulteriore riscaldamento e cambiamenti in tutti i componenti del sistema climatico. Limitare i cambiamenti climatici richiederà riduzioni sostanziali e sostenute delle emissioni di gas serra.

L'oceano globale continuerà a scaldarsi durante il 21st secolo. Il calore penetra dalla superficie all'oceano profondo e influenza la circolazione oceanica.

È molto probabile che la copertura di ghiaccio del Mare Artico continuerà a ridursi e assottigliarsi e che la copertura nevosa primaverile dell'emisfero nord diminuirà durante il 21st secolo man mano che la temperatura media globale della superficie aumenta. Il volume globale del ghiacciaio diminuirà ulteriormente.

Il livello medio globale del mare continuerà a salire durante il 21st secolo. Sotto tutti gli scenari RCP il tasso di innalzamento del livello del mare molto probabilmente supererà quello osservato durante 1971-2010 a causa dell'aumento del riscaldamento degli oceani e dell'aumento della perdita di massa da parte dei ghiacciai e delle calotte glaciali.

L'innalzamento del livello del mare non sarà uniforme. Entro la fine del 21st secolo, è molto probabile che il livello del mare aumenti di oltre il 95% della superficie oceanica. A proposito di 70% delle coste mondiali si prevede di sperimentare un cambiamento del livello del mare entro il 20% della variazione globale del livello del mare.

I cambiamenti climatici influenzeranno i processi del ciclo del carbonio in un modo che aggraverà l'aumento di CO2 nell'atmosfera (alta sicurezza). Un ulteriore assorbimento di carbonio da parte dell'oceano aumenterà l'acidificazione degli oceani.

Le emissioni cumulative di CO2 determinano in gran parte il riscaldamento superficiale medio globale entro la fine del 21st secolo e oltre. La maggior parte degli aspetti dei cambiamenti climatici permangono per molti secoli anche se le emissioni di CO2 vengono interrotte. Questo rappresenta un sostanziale impegno multi-secolo sui cambiamenti climatici creato dalle emissioni passate, presenti e future di CO2.

Una grande parte del cambiamento climatico antropogenico derivante dalle emissioni di CO2 è irreversibile su una scala temporale plurisecolare o millenaria, tranne nel caso di una grande rimozione netta di CO2 dall'atmosfera per un periodo prolungato.

Le temperature della superficie rimarranno approssimativamente costanti a livelli elevati per molti secoli dopo una completa cessazione delle emissioni antropogeniche di CO2. A causa delle lunghe scale temporali di trasferimento di calore dalla superficie dell'oceano alla profondità, il riscaldamento dell'oceano continuerà per secoli. A seconda dello scenario, circa 15 a 40% di CO2 emessa rimarrà nell'atmosfera più a lungo degli anni 1,000.

Una perdita di massa sostenuta da strati di ghiaccio causerebbe un innalzamento del livello del mare più ampio e una parte della perdita di massa potrebbe essere irreversibile. Vi è un'elevata certezza che il riscaldamento prolungato superiore a qualche soglia porterebbe alla quasi completa perdita della calotta glaciale della Groenlandia nel corso di un millennio o più, provocando un innalzamento medio del livello medio del mare fino a 7 m.

Le stime correnti indicano che la soglia è maggiore di circa 1 ° C (bassa confidenza) ma inferiore a circa 4 ° C (media affidabilità) del riscaldamento globale rispetto al preindustriale. È possibile una brusca e irreversibile perdita di ghiaccio da una potenziale instabilità dei settori marittimi della calotta di ghiaccio antartico in risposta al forzante climatico, ma le prove e la comprensione attuali non sono sufficienti per effettuare una valutazione quantitativa.

Sono stati proposti metodi che mirano a modificare deliberatamente il sistema climatico per contrastare il cambiamento climatico, chiamato geoingegneria. Prove limitate precludono una valutazione quantitativa completa sia della Solar Radiation Management (SRM) che della rimozione dell'anidride carbonica (CDR) e del loro impatto sul sistema climatico.

I metodi CDR hanno limiti biogeochimici e tecnologici al loro potenziale su scala globale. Non c'è una conoscenza sufficiente per quantificare quante emissioni di CO2 potrebbero essere parzialmente compensate dal CDR in un periodo di tempo di un secolo.

La modellazione indica che i metodi SRM, se realizzabili, hanno il potenziale per compensare sostanzialmente un aumento della temperatura globale, ma potrebbero anche modificare il ciclo globale dell'acqua e non ridurre l'acidificazione degli oceani.

Se l'SRM fosse terminato per qualsiasi motivo, vi è un'alta probabilità che le temperature superficiali globali aumenterebbero molto rapidamente a valori coerenti con la forzatura dei gas serra. I metodi CDR e SRM portano effetti collaterali e conseguenze a lungo termine su scala globale.

Modifiche da 2007 Then and Now

Probabile aumento di temperatura di 2100: 1.5-4 ° C nella maggior parte degli scenari - da 1.8-4 ° C
Aumento del livello del mare: molto probabilmente più veloce che tra 1971 e 2010 - di 28-43 cm
Il ghiaccio marino artico estivo scompare: molto probabilmente continuerà a ridursi e ad assottigliarsi - nella seconda metà del secolo
Aumento delle ondate di calore: molto probabile che si verifichi più frequentemente e duri più a lungo - aumenta molto probabilmente


Video: Volcanoes - Best Of Explosive Eruptions In HD!


Previous Article

Cypress: home care, transplant, reproduction, why it dries

Next Article

Growing Snap Peas – How To Grow Snap Peas