Information About Dichondra


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Silver Falls Houseplant: Growing A Silver Falls Dichondra In The Home

By Mary Ellen Ellis

As an outdoor plant it makes a pretty ground cover or trailing plant, but growing a Silver Falls dichondra indoors is also a great option. This hardy evergreen plant grows gorgeous silvery foliage and makes a nice addition to any home with the right care. Learn more here.


Seed-Starting Mixtures

From the day they germinate, vegetable seedlings face challenges from fungi and bacteria in water, soil and air. The fewer troublemakers they face, the better they can grow, which is why using fresh seed-starting mix each winter is so crucial. Quality seed-starting mixes are formulated to discourage common soilborne pathogens that cause seedlings to rot, and to retain both water and air with ease.

You can make your own seed-starting mix by using either peat moss or coir as a base, and then blending it with compost that has been heated to 150 degrees Fahrenheit to kill any pathogens and weed seeds. Small amounts of vermicompost can be a beneficial addition when added to a seed-starting mix, but use no more than 10 percent by volume.

As a 2005 study from North Carolina State University revealed, it’s not the precise mixture but what’s on top of the soil that counts most. Differences almost disappeared between commercial organic seed-starting mixtures and various homemade mixtures after all of the seeds were covered with vermiculite instead of a planting medium.

Made from two naturally occurring minerals, vermiculite has unmatched natural talents in seed-starting mixtures: It can absorb and retain several times its own weight in moisture while still holding some oxygen. (Regulations that require regular inspection of processing facilities have addressed concerns about possible asbestos contamination in vermiculite. The Organic Materials Review Institute has approved the use of the Therm-O-Rock brand.)


How to Grow Dichondra

Last Updated: March 29, 2019 References

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

There are 33 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 32,576 times.

Available in silver or green shades, dichondra makes a great ornament in any lawn or garden, if you live in a warm area. It’s an easy-to-grow option for either a groundcover or planter. You can grow dichondra as a perennial in warm climates or an annual in colder climates. If you plant it in the ground, it will beautifully carpet your yard or garden. In a planter, dichondra will spill out in a waterfall of lush leaves. Once seeds you’ve started begin to sprout, you can transplant them and care for beautiful plants in your garden.


Chemical Control

Lawns: Dollarweed thrives in weak, thin turf with excessive moisture. The first defense against dollarweed is to reduce moisture levels and modify cultural methods (i.e., proper mowing height and irrigation). After taking steps to modify the lawn care techniques, a chemical control may still be necessary to further reduce the dollarweed population. Herbicides should be chosen according to turf species and applied in late spring (after full spring green-up of the lawn) when weeds are small. Herbicide effectiveness is reduced as weeds mature.

Atrazine can be applied to St. Augustinegrass and centipedegrass up to two times a year. For maximum effect atrazine should be applied once in the fall and again in late spring (after spring green-up). Atrazine has a pre- and post-emergent effect on weeds, which means it helps to control both emerged weeds and weed seed. It should NOT be applied to newly seeded lawns due to the detrimental effect it has on seed germination. Delay atrazine applications to newly sodded and sprigged lawns until it is well-established and actively growing. Examples of products containing atrazine in homeowner sizes are:

  • Hi-Yield Atrazine Weed Killer
  • Southern Ag Atrazine St Augustine Weed Killer
  • Image for St. Augustinegrass & Centipedegrass with Atrazine
  • Spectracide Weed Stop for Lawns for St. Augustine & Centipede Lawns RTS

Dollarweed in a lawn.
Bert McCarty, Clemson University

A three-way herbicide may be used safely on bermudagrass, zoysiagrass, centipedegrass, St. Augustinegrass, and tall fescue. The active ingredients of a three-way herbicide include the following broadleaf weed killers: 2,4- D, dicamba, and mecoprop (MCPP) or MCPA. Examples of three-way herbicides in homeowner sizes are:

  • Ferti-lome Weed-Out Lawn Weed Killer – Contains Trimec ®
  • Southern Ag Lawn Weed Killer with Trimec ®
  • Bayer Advanced Southern Weed Killer for Lawns Concentrate or RTS
  • Spectracide Weed Stop Weed Killer for Lawns Concentrate or RTS
  • Bonide Weed Beater – Lawn Weed Killer Concentrate
  • Ortho Weed B Gon Weed Killer for Lawns Concentrate or RTS

CAUTION: Herbicides containing 2,4-D should be applied at a reduced rate on St. Augustinegrass and centipedegrass to prevent damage to these lawns. The product label will give the rate to use for each type of turfgrass. If a second application is needed, apply the herbicide in spot treatments. Repeated applications of a three-way herbicide should be spaced according to label directions. Three-way herbicides should not be applied during spring transition (green-up of lawn) or when air temperatures exceed 90 ºF. A newly seeded lawn should be mowed a minimum of three times before applying an herbicide.

Imazaquin (such as in Image Nutsedge Killer) can be applied safely to bermudagrass, St. Augustinegrass, centipedegrass, and zoysiagrass, but do not apply to tall fescue. Apply imazaquin in the late spring (after spring green-up) when weeds are small. A second application can be made in six weeks after the initial application. Do not apply to newly planted, plugged or sodded turfgrass.

Both atrazine and imazaquin can travel through soil and enter ground water, please read the label for all environmental precautions. Users are advised not to apply atrazine or imazaquin to sand or loamy sand soils where the water table (groundwater) is close to the surface and where these soils are very permeable, i.e., well-drained.

The herbicide mix of thiencarbazone, iodosulfuron, and dicamba, as found in Celsius WG Herbicide, is selective to control many broadleaf weeds and several grass weeds in all four of the common warm-season grasses. It cannot be used in fescue lawns, but can be used to remove fescue from warm-season lawns. Apply when dollarweed is actively growing and again 2 to 4 weeks later. The addition of a non-ionic surfactant, such as Southern Ag Surfactant for Herbicides, will increase control (see Table 1).

Once dollarweed has been eliminated in areas of the turf, bare spots will be left behind. To prevent the invasion of new weeds in these bare spots fill them with plugs or sprigs of the desired turfgrass. Fertilize the lawn based on soil report recommendations.

Table 1. Turf Tolerance to Herbicides for Dollarweed Control.

Herbicide Bermuda Centipede St. Augustine Tall Fescue Zoysia
atrazine D S S NR NR
(3- way) 2,4-D + MCPP + dicamba S I I S S
imazaquin S-I S S NR S
thiencarbazone, iodosulfuron, & dicamba 1 S S S 2 NR S
S=Safe at labeled rates
I= Intermediate safety, use at reduced rates
NR= Not registered for use on and/or damages this turfgrass
D = Fully dormant turf only.
Note: Do not apply postemergence herbicides, except Celsius WG Herbicide, to lawns during the spring green up of turfgrass.
1 This mix of active ingredients requires the addition of 2 teaspoons of a non-ionic surfactant (that is, a wetter-sticker agent to aid in weed control at 0.25% by volume) per gallon of water, such as Hi-Yield Spreader Sticker.
2 Spot treatments to St. Augustinegrass at temperatures above 90 degrees may cause temporary growth regulation.

Landscape Beds: In landscape beds, dollarweed can be hand dug or controlled with an herbicide. Dollarweed is a perennial weed that can emerge from seeds, tubers, and rhizomes. Once dollarweed has made its way into the landscape bed, an herbicide may be necessary if hand pulling is not practical.

Glyphosate can be used for spot treatments around ornamental plants. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide that should be used with caution. Spray with a 3% Glyphosate solution in a pump-up sprayer for dollarweed control. Do not allow glyphosate spray mist to contact ornamental foliage or stems as severe injury will occur. A cardboard shield may be used to prevent glyphosate spray from drifting to nearby ornamentals. Examples of products containing glyphosate in homeowner sizes are:

  • Roundup Original Concentrate,
  • Roundup Pro Herbicide,
  • Martin’s Eraser Systemic Weed & Grass Killer,
  • Quick Kill Grass & Weed Killer,
  • Bonide Kleenup Weed & Grass Killer 41% Super Concentrate,
  • Hi-Yield Super Concentrate,
  • Maxide Super Concentrate 41% Weed & Grass Killer,
  • Super Concentrate Killzall Weed & Grass Killer,
  • Tiger Brand Quick Kill Concentrate,
  • Ultra Kill Weed & Grass Killer Concentrate,
  • Gordon’s Groundwork Concentrate 50% Super Weed & Grass Killer,
  • Zep Enforcer Weed Defeat III,
  • Eliminator Weed & Grass Killer Super Concentrate,
  • Monterey Remuda Full Strength 41% Glyphosate,
  • Knock Out Weed & Grass Killer Super Concentrate,
  • Southern States Grass & Weed Killer Concentrate II,
  • Total Kill Pro Weed & Grass Killer Herbicide,
  • Ace Concentrate Weed & Grass Killer.

Imazaquin (Image Nutsedge Killer) is a selective herbicide that can be applied safely around certain landscape plants see product label for a listing of the plant materials. Imazaquin should not be applied around the root zones of plants not on the product label. It is best to apply imazaquin when weeds are small in spring. A second application can be applied six weeks later if necessary.

Glyphosate and imazaquin are both more effective when weeds are actively growing and should not be applied under drought conditions. As with all pesticides, read and follow all label instructions and precautions.

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at [email protected] or 1-888-656-9988.

Original Author(s)

Millie Davenport, Director of Home and Garden Information Center, Horticulture Program Team, Clemson University

Revisions by:

Joey Williamson, PhD, HGIC Horticulture Extension Agent, Clemson University

This information is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement of brand names or registered trademarks by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service is implied, nor is any discrimination intended by the exclusion of products or manufacturers not named. All recommendations are for South Carolina conditions and may not apply to other areas. Use pesticides only according to the directions on the label. All recommendations for pesticide use are for South Carolina only and were legal at the time of publication, but the status of registration and use patterns are subject to change by action of state and federal regulatory agencies. Follow all directions, precautions and restrictions that are listed.


Watch the video: Beautiful Dichondra silver falls plant and Dichondra repens plant. the lawn that cannot be cut.


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