Zone 9 Lilac Care: Growing Lilacs In Zone 9 Gardens


By: Teo Spengler

Lilacs are a spring staple in cool climates but many varieties, like the classic common lilac, require a cold winter to produce buds for the following spring. Can lilacs grow in zone 9? Happily, some cultivars have been developed for warmer climates. Read on for tips for growing lilacs in zone 9 as well as a selection of top zone 9 lilac varieties.

Lilacs for Zone 9

Common lilacs (Syringa vulgaris) are the old-fashioned type of lilac and offer the biggest flowers, the best fragrance and the most enduring blooms. They typically require chilly periods in winter and only thrive in zones 5 through 7. They are not appropriate as lilacs for zone 9.

Can lilacs grow in zone 9? Some can. With just a little effort you can find lilac shrubs that thrive in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 and 9.

Zone 9 Lilac Varieties

When you dream of growing lilacs in zone 9, look beyond the classic lilacs to the newer cultivars. Some have been bred to grow in warmer zones.

The most popular choices include Blue Skies (Syringa vulgaris “Blue Skies”) with its highly fragrant flowers. The Excel lilac (Syringa x hyacinthiflora “Excel”) is a hybrid that flowers up to 10 days before other varieties. It can grow to 12 feet (3.6 m.) tall. Another attractive species, the cutleaf lilac (Syringa laciniata), may also do well in zone 9.

Another possibility is Lavender Lady (Syringa vulgaris “Lavender Lady”), from Descanso Hybrids. It was developed for Southern California’s zone 9 climate. Lavender Lady grows into a small lavender tree, up to 12 feet (3.6 m.) tall and half that wide.

Descanso was also responsible for developing White Angel (Syringa vulgaris “White Angel”), another option for zone 9. This shrub amazes with its creamy white lilac blooms.

And keep an eye out for a new lilac from Proven Winners called Bloomerang. It thrives in zone 9 and produces explosions of light or dark purple flowers in spring.

Zone 9 Lilac Care

Zone 9 lilac care is very similar to lilac care in cooler zones. Plant the zone 9 lilac varieties in a site with full sun.

As far as soil, lilacs for zone 9 – like other lilacs – require moist, fertile, well-drained soil and regular irrigation in dry periods. If you need to prune the lilac, do so right after the plants spring blooms fade.

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Read more about Zone 9, 10 & 11


Appearance of Lilac Trees

Lilacs are mostly large bushes or small trees, often with one or several slender trunks, and an upright, rounded crown of branches. There are also smaller shrub varieties. The deciduous leaves are heart-shaped, mostly with a smooth, slightly glossy surface, and a smooth margin. The leaves are deep green, making an attractive background color in the garden, and they turn yellow in the fall, before dropping to the ground. The bark of the stems is usually gray and smooth, or rougher in older stems.

Each flower is small, perhaps a quarter-inch or so across, but they are carried in large clusters, called panicles, of many hundreds of flowers, shaped like a tall pyramid, slightly drooping, and up to eight inches or more in length. There are many colors of flowers, even including some soft yellows, as well as the more familiar pinks, lilacs and purples.

Lilac Bushes are typically 6 to 15 feet tall, but their size can be modified by pruning. Some are smaller, and the Tree Lilac, which is an entirely different species, grows into a medium-sized tree, reaching 20 or 30 feet.


Can lilacs grow in Arizona?

See full answer. Simply so, do lilacs grow in the desert?

Lilacs are not desert plants so they require lots of compost mixed in the soil at the time of planting with the soil covered in wood chips that decay over time. They should not be in rock mulch. As with any seasonal flowering shrub or tree the best time to prune them is soon after flowering.

Furthermore, can lilacs grow in Zone 9? Lilacs for Zone 9 Common lilacs (Syringa vulgaris) are the old-fashioned type of lilac and offer the biggest flowers, the best fragrance and the most enduring blooms. They typically require chilly periods in winter and only thrive in zones 5 through 7. They are not appropriate as lilacs for zone 9.

Likewise, can lilacs grow in the South?

Sadly, not all lilacs are suited to the heat of the south. They often need a long period of winter chill for buds to mature and bloom the following spring. However, some lilac varieties and cultivars bloom well in the Lower South Region.

Cold hardy to below -20 degrees, they grow even in the most frigid north-facing gardens in Arizona. Peonies can hold their own with even the most beautiful tropical flowers, but with far better fragrance. Peonies are unlike many other perennials, in that they do not need to be divided regularly.


Watch the video: Are Lilac Bushes Poisonous to Animals?


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