Goldrush Apple Care: Tips For Growing Goldrush Apples


By: Liz Baessler

Goldrush apples are known for their intensely sweet flavor, pleasant yellow color, and resistance to disease. Keep reading to learn more about how to grow Goldrush apples, and tips for planting Goldrush apple trees in your home garden or orchard.

Goldrush Apple Information

Where do Goldrush apple trees come from? A Goldrush apple seedling was planted for the very first time in 1974 as a cross between Golden Delicious and Co-op 17 varieties. In 1994, the resulting apple was released by the Purdue, Rutgers, and Illinois (PRI) apple breeding program.

The apples themselves are relatively large (6-7 cm. in diameter), firm, and crisp. The fruit is green to yellow with an occasional red blush at the time of picking, but it deepens to a pleasant gold in storage. In fact, Goldrush apples are excellent for winter storage. They appear very late in the growing season, and can hold up easily for three and up to seven months after being harvested.

They actually attain a better color and flavor after several months off the tree. The flavor which, at harvest time, can be described as spicy and somewhat tangy, mellows and deepens into being exceptionally sweet.

Goldrush Apple Care

Growing Goldrush apples is rewarding, as the trees are resistant to apple scab, powdery mildew, and fire blight, of which many other apple trees are susceptible.

Goldrush apple trees are naturally biennial producers, which means they will produce a large crop of fruit every other year. By thinning the fruit early in the growing season, however, you should be able to get your tree to produce well annually.

The trees are self-sterile and cannot pollinate themselves, so it’s necessary to have other apple varieties nearby for cross-pollination to ensure good fruit set. Some good pollinizers for Goldrush apple trees include Gala, Golden Delicious, and Enterprise.

This article was last updated on


How to Care for Golden Delicious Apple Trees

Related Articles

"Golden Delicious" apples (Malus x domestica "Golden Delicious"), named for their yellow-green to golden yellow color, grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 9. Trees feature a showy display of light pink flowers in spring, which make way for a mid- to late-summer crop. The crisp, sweet fruit works well for cooking and baking, and tastes delicious fresh-picked from the tree. Tree size largely depends on the rootstock on which the tree is grown standard trees grow up to 20 feet tall, while dwarf trees grow 8 to 10 feet tall, requiring less garden space.

Plant the "Golden Delicious" tree in full sun in a hole twice as wide and as deep as the root ball and with well-drained soil. Space standard trees 30 feet apart, semidwarf trees 18 feet apart and dwarf trees 8 feet apart, with 25 feet, 15 feet and 8 feet between rows, respectively. Plant in late winter during the dormant season.

Keep the area within the tree's drip line, which lies immediately below the outer branches, free of grass and weeds. Add a 3-inch layer of mulch within the drip line to help with moisture retention and weed prevention. Remove any fallen fruit or foliage from this area to prevent the spread of disease and insects.

Paint the trunk and lower branches of new "Golden Delicious" trees with whitewash, mixing equal parts water and white latex paint, to protect the trunk from sun damage. Paint the entire trunk, including 2 inches below soil.

Water the tree frequently in the first year to keep the soil moist but not wet. Water new trees once or twice weekly to establish healthy roots and branches mature trees usually require water only once weekly or every two weeks. Water more frequently in periods of drought. Water inside the drip line, the area directly below the outer leaves in the canopy, to a depth of 18 to 24 inches at each watering, but avoid directly spraying the tree trunk. Trees require supplemental watering in winter only if you go several weeks without any rainfall water to a depth of 24 to 36 inches once in winter, if needed.

Train a young tree to a central leader, selecting one strong, upright branch. Train additional scaffold branches in whorls evenly spaced around the trunk, with about 18 to 24 inches of vertical space between whorls. The angle at the joint of scaffold branches and the trunk should be close to 90 degrees. Place a clothespin or piece of wood between the trunk and branches, if needed, to spread the branches to a wider angle remove the spreaders after one year.

Fertilize trees twice annually, in May and July, with 4 to 8 ounces of ammonium sulfate for young trees and up to 4 pounds total throughout the growing season for mature trees. You can also add a complete fertilizer, containing nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, following the package directions for specific application rates. Alternatively, you can use 3 inches of compost and manure as mulch to supply nutrients to the soil.

Prune trees annually in late winter during the dormant season before new growth begins. Remove up to 20 percent of the previous year's growth each year. Cut dead and broken branches back to the nearest healthy branch union or just outside the branch collar -- the protective tissue ring at the base of the branch -- if the entire branch must be removed. Cut diseased branches at least 12 inches outside of the diseased area, and disinfect pruners in a 10-percent bleach solution after making each cut. Remove any rubbing or crossing branches to encourage an open canopy, cutting back to a branch union or just above an outward-facing bud.

Spray trees with a dormant oil spray in the dormant season to control insects, aphids, mites and other pests, if needed, following the product label for specific instructions. Treat with a calcium polysulfide spray in early spring to prevent powdery mildew. Spray once when new buds are green and again when they turn pink just before the flowers open repeat application once every 10 days throughout the spring rainy season.

Thin fruit to leave only two fruits in each cluster when the fruit reaches 3/4 inches in diameter. You might wish to remove all fruit for the first few years so that the tree's energy is used only for establishing a healthy root system and strong branches.


Growing Apples in the Home Orchard

Should I Attempt to Grow Apples in the Home Orchard?

A home apple orchard can conveniently provide tasty, fresh fruits for family consumption. One can also have cultivars that may not otherwise be readily available at grocery stores or local orchards. A well-established and maintained apple orchard also enhances the appearance of the home landscape as specimen, border, espaliered or trellised plants, while producing food for the family.

However, there is more to growing fruit than planting the trees and harvesting the crop. Growing high-quality apples requires considerable knowledge about cultivar selection, planting site, soil types, planting techniques, training, pruning, fertilization and pest management. Without sufficient and proper care for apple trees, fruit quality will be quite poor.

What Apple Cultivars Should I Select?

Many apple cultivars are currently available. When selecting apple cultivars for a home apple orchard, one must consider fruit size, taste, color, bloom period, ripening season, disease resistance and pollen compatibility, all of which are important factors.

Figure 1. Fruits of Enterprise. Photo courtesy of Dave Koester, Campbell County Cooperative Extension Service, University of Kentucky.

Home apple growers should consider growing cultivars that are resistant to important diseases such as apple scab, cedar apple rust, and fire blight. Some of the more common disease-resistant apple cultivars are Enterprise (Figure 1), Goldrush, Jonafree, Liberty, Pristine, Redfree and Williams’ Pride. Disease-resistant apple cultivars suggested for home orchards in Ohio are summarized in Table 1, which also gives their cultural characteristics. It is not practical to list all of the disease-resistant cultivars in this fact sheet.

There are also many excellent apple cultivars that are not disease resistant and are much better suited for commercial production. Nonresistant cultivars can be successfully grown in home orchards if an effective disease-management program is followed. This generally requires the use of fungicides. Home apple growers need to be fully aware of the work, time and pesticides involved in disease- and pest-management programs before selecting apple cultivars that are not disease resistant.

All apple cultivars are considered self-incompatible, meaning that they cannot pollinate themselves or any flowers of the same cultivar. You will need to plant at least two different cultivars of apple trees together in order to achieve maximum fruit yield and quality. In addition, the two cultivars selected need to have viable pollen and bloom at the same time to ensure successful pollination. Some nurseries also offer apple trees that have two or more compatible cultivars grafted on the same tree.

Table 1: Apple-Scab Resistant Cultivars Suggested for Home Orchards in Ohio.
Apple Cultivar Ripening Season Bloom Season Brief Description of Cultivar
Pristine Early Early Fruit is medium to large in size and has a canary-yellow color, often with a blush. Texture is fine. Flavor is somewhat tart, excellent for cooking or fresh eating. The cultivar is field immune to apple scab, highly resistant to powdery mildew, resistant to cedar apple rust, and moderately resistant to fire blight. Pollinates with Pristine, Williams’ Pride, Redfree, Jonafree and Liberty.
Williams’ Pride Early Mid Fruit is medium to large in size, slightly striped with dark red to purple red. Flesh is firm, very juicy, and spicy. It keeps very well. It is good for fresh eating and cooking. The cultivar is field immune to apple scab and apple rusts, and is resistant to powdery mildew and fire blight. Pollinates with other mid- and late-blooming cultivars.
Redfree Early Mid Fruit is medium sized with bright red color. Flesh is firm with good texture. Flavor is sweet and aromatic. Fruit stores one month or more in refrigeration. It is good for fresh eating and cooking. The cultivar is field immune to apple scab and cedar apple rust, and is moderately resistant to powdery mildew. It has good resistance to fire blight. Pollinates with other mid- and late-blooming cultivars.
Jonafree Mid Mid Fruit is medium in size with a 75-90% medium red blush. Flesh is firm, crisp, and moderately rich in flavor. Its flavor is similar to Jonathan and good for fresh eating, sauce, pies, and cider. It is not prone to bitter pit or Jonathan spot. The cultivar is field immune to scab, and is less susceptible to powdery mildew, fire blight, and cedar apple rust than Jonathan. Pollinates with Goldrush or Enterprise.
Liberty Mid Mid Fruit is medium in size and is mostly red-striped over a greenish-yellow background. Flesh is white, fine-textured, crisp and juicy. Flavor is very good, sprightly, subacid and sweet. Good for eating fresh, cooking, canning and desserts. The cultivar is highly resistant to apple scab, and is resistant to cedar apple rust and fire blight. It is moderately resistant to powdery mildew. Pollinates with other mid and late blooming cultivars.
Enterprise Late Mid to late Fruit is large in size. It has a bright red and glossy finish. It is firm and crisp. Its flavor is spicy and juicy. It is good for fresh eating and cooking. It stores well if refrigerated. The cultivar is field immune to apple scab, is moderately resistant to powdery mildew, and is highly resistant to cedar apple rust and fire blight. Pollinates with Goldrush, Gala and Golden Delicious.
Goldrush Late Late Fruit is large in size, firm, very crisp. The yellow fruit is semi-tart and juicy and has exceptional storage life. It is good for fresh eating and cooking. It is field immune to apple scab, moderately resistant to powdery mildew, and highly resistant to fire blight. Pollinates with Enterprise, Gala and Golden Delicious.

Should I Grow Dwarf Trees or Standard-Size Trees?

Home apple growers should grow either dwarf or semi-dwarf trees instead of standard or full-size trees. Dwarf and semi-dwarf trees are easier to manage, and they produce fruits earlier than standard-size trees. However, some of the dwarf or semi-dwarf apple trees need to be supported since they have poor root anchorage (Figure 2).

Apple cultivars are usually grafted onto different rootstocks. In theory, all apple cultivars can be available in dwarf, semi-dwarf and standard sizes since it is mainly the rootstock that determines the tree size. Dwarf apple trees will grow to be about 10 feet tall. Semi-dwarf apple trees will reach about 15 feet in height, while standard-size trees will be at least 20 feet tall.

Figure 2. "Goldrush" apple on M9 dwarf rootstock. Note the supports for the trees. Photo courtesy of Dave Ferree, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University.

Where Should I Plant Apple Trees?

Apple trees need full sun for proper growth and quality fruit production. The early morning sun is particularly important since it dries the dew from the leaves, thereby reducing the incidence of diseases. Apple planting sites should be free of spring frosts and have good air circulation. Apple trees grow well in a wide range of soil types. They prefer soils with a texture of sandy loam to a sandy clay loam soil. Good soil drainage is also critical for successful apple production. Ideal soil pH for apple trees is near 6.5.

When and How Should I Plant Apple Trees?

Apple trees can be purchased through mail-order catalogs as bare-rooted whips which are one year old and single-stem trees without any side branches. They can also be purchased from local nurseries or garden centers as container-grown trees. However, a much greater selection of apple cultivars is available through catalogs.

If home apple producers choose to grow apple trees from whips, they should order apple trees early for spring planting in March or April. When plants arrive, do not allow the roots to dry out. It may be best to “heel in” the plants until the soil is dry enough to prepare for proper planting. To heel in the plants, dig a small trench and cover the plants with 2 to 3 inches of soil.

Before planting, soak the tree roots in water for half an hour. Dig a deep and wide hole to accommodate the root system. Spread the roots before filling the hole. Hold the tree in place so that the bud union is 2 to 3 inches above ground level. Otherwise, the scion or cultivar will form roots, and dwarf or semi-dwarf trees will turn into standard-size trees. Cover the roots with top soil and leave the sub soil for use last. Before the hole is completely filled with soil, add two gallons of water. After planting, apply water at the rate of two to three gallons per tree every two to three weeks.

Keep an area at least 12 inches away from the tree trunk free of grasses and weeds. Mulch applied 2 to 3 inches deep over the root zone can help control weeds and conserve soil moisture.

If home apple growers choose to plant container-grown trees, they can plant these trees any time during the growing season as long as sufficient water is supplied. The depth of planting is dependent on soil type or texture. In sandy loam soils that drain well, plants should be positioned in the planting hole at the level they were originally grown in the nursery. Most Ohio soils, however, are not well-drained. They usually consist of silt and clay particles, and drainage is often less than desirable. In soils that drain poorly, plants should be planted somewhat higher than they were in the nursery. More air needs to reach the root system when soils drain poorly. In these soil conditions, plants can be placed from 2 to 4 inches higher than they were during their growth in the nursery.

The width of the planting hole should be at least two or three times the diameter of the root ball. After placing the container-grown tree in the planting hole, back fill with soil. Apply water at the rate of two to three gallons per tree every two to three weeks. Mulch 2 to 3 inches deep. Refer to OSU Extension fact sheet 1014, Preparation and Planting of Landscape Plants, for more information.

Plant dwarf trees about 8 feet apart in the row and allow 14 feet between rows. Semi-dwarf trees should be spaced 10 feet apart in the row with 16 feet between rows.

How Do I Prune and Train Young Apple Trees?

Bare-root whips need to be pruned and trained so that they will develop into properly shaped trees. Container-grown apple trees are normally two- to three-year-old trees. These trees need lime spreading and light pruning.

Bare-root trees should be cut or “headed” back to 24 inches to 28 inches above ground at planting. All broken or damaged limbs should be removed. This procedure allows branches to form at desired heights, improves the strength of the tree, and provides a balance between the top and roots.

As the branches reach 4 to 6 inches in length, spring-loaded clothes pins can be used to form proper crotch angles (Figure 3.) These clothes pins should be removed at the end of the first season. Branches that begin to grow at 18 inches or lower can be cut off during the summer.

After one and two years of growth, all lateral branches below 18 inches or below the first lateral are removed. Remove limbs that have narrow crotch angles (less that 45 degrees).

Apple trees are trained to the central-leader system which will allow three to four groups of four branches to develop for a standard-sized tree. The central leader is cut in March at 18 inches to 24 inches above the last group of limbs to ensure the development of more limbs (Figure 4).

A two- or three-year-old apple tree needs limb spreading to achieve a tree that is wide at the bottom and tapers to a point as shown in Figure 5.

During the third and fourth years, remove all unwanted branches from central leaders and continue to spread limbs as necessary. The central leader will eventually be cut back into second-year wood, to bring the central leader into balance with the rest of the tree. Maintain a central leader and pyramidal form on into maturity. Never allow an upper tier to shade out or outgrow lower limbs.

Figure 3. Clothes pins are used to hold young branches at desired branch angles. Figure 4. A one-year-old apple tree with lateral branches and central leader (CL). Figure 5. A two-year-old apple tree with spreaders.

How Do I Prune Mature Apple Trees?

Apple trees should be pruned annually in March. Refer to OSU Extension fact sheet 1150, Pruning Mature Apples and Pears, for more information. Home apple growers are also encouraged to attend fruit-tree pruning clinics offered through many local Extension offices.

How Do I Prune Old and Neglected Apple Trees?

Pruning neglected trees normally requires the removal of many large limbs. Try to picture what a perfectly pruned tree should look like and decide which limbs should be removed. Remove two to three large limbs each year and bring the tree back to shape in three years rather than one year. Cut large limbs flush with the bark of a lower limb.

Table 2: Pounds of 10-6-4 Fertilizer to Apply to Each Apple Tree According to Tree Age When Trees are Grown in Sod.*
Tree Age Amount of Fertilizer Applied (Pounds)
1 0.5
2 1.0
3 1.5
4 2.0
5 2.5
6 3.0
7 3.5
8 4.0
9 4.5
10 5.0
11 5.5
12 6.0
13 6.5
14 7.0
15-35 7.5
*Double the amount for 5-10-10 fertilizer or decrease the amount by half for 20-5-10 fertilizer. If trees are not grown in sod, reduce the amount by half.

How Do I Fertilize My Apple Trees?

Apple trees should be fertilized each year in the spring. For optimum tree growth and fruit quality, conduct a soil test every two to three years to determine the appropriate fertilizer and application rates. Refer to Table 2 for suggested fertilizer application rates. Apply the recommended fertilizer as a broadcast over the area under the tree drip line.

How Can I Tell if My Apples Are Ripe?

Apples reach maturity at different times, depending on variety and climate. There is not a specific date at which you can expect to harvest your apples.

Instead, you can observe your apples as they grow and inspect the fruit for certain changes that indicate maturity. The “ground” or base skin color of the apple changes from green to yellow as the fruit matures. Flesh color also loses its greenish tint and turns yellow or white. When you are convinced that the apples look mature, take a bite! A mature fruit will be crisp and juicy. A pleasing taste is the final indicator of fruit maturity.

Why Do My Apple Trees Fail to Produce Fruits?

Apple trees sometimes fail to produce fruits for many reasons. Some of these reasons include lack of time to reach bearing age, lack of compatible pollinating cultivars, absence of honeybees or bumblebees, attack by insects and diseases, too much shading, unfavorable weather, improper pruning, too much nitrogen application and the tendency of some cultivars to produce heavy for one year and light for the following.

Should I Spray My Apple Trees?

Apples have many diseases and insect pests. Some of the common diseases that attack apple trees are apple scab, powdery mildew, black rot and frogeye leaf spot, rusts, collar rot, sooty blotch and fly speck, and fire blight. Some of the common insects and mites attacking apples are apple maggot, codling moth, plum curculio, San Jose Scale, European red mite and aphids. Apple cultivars listed in Table 1 are not resistant to insects or mites. A certain amount of pesticide (insecticides and fungicides) use is generally required for quality apple production.

Refer to OSU Extension Bulletin 780, Controlling Disease and Insects in Home Fruit Planting, for more information on disease and insect management. Home fruit growers are also encouraged to purchase a copy of the OSU Extension Bulletin 940, Midwest Home Fruit Production Guide.


Totally Green Apples

MICHAEL PHILLIPS has spent more than 20 years growing apples up here in the north country, 30 miles south of Quebec, and debunking the commonly held belief that his favorite fruit can’t survive without pesticides.

Not that he hasn’t taken some hits.

“I lost 50 apple trees getting my degree in borers,” said Mr. Phillips, 54, on a recent afternoon, standing by a Northern Spy tree, one of 240 apple trees on this hilly 58-acre farmstead called Heartsong Farm. He was speaking of the round-headed apple-tree borer, in particular, which can kill a tree if undetected.

Most growers spray their trees with a pesticide, like Lorsban, to kill the borers. But Mr. Phillips uses neem oil, which comes from the neem tree, to interrupt the insect’s life cycle.

He also feeds his trees with composted wood chips, plants comfrey around the roots and sprays them with concoctions of horsetail and stinging nettles.

Mr. Phillips broke new ground with “The Apple Grower: A Guide for the Organic Orchardist,” a 1998 book that defied the common belief that apples cannot be grown without chemical pesticides. At the time, he allowed that fungicides, like copper and sulfur sprays, were sometimes necessary. (Both compounds may be used by certified organic growers.)

“I was learning to reduce all that, but I didn’t really shift the paradigm,” he said.

But the more he thought about how homegrown food and medicinal herbs bolstered his own health (his wife, Nancy, is an herbalist), the more he became convinced of the importance of feeding his trees with fungal-rich mulch and herbal sprays that boosted their immune systems.

In his latest book, he rejects even copper and sulfur sprays.

“The Holistic Orchard: Tree Fruits and Berries the Biological Way,” which will be published next month by Chelsea Green, explains how to grow fruit with nothing more lethal than neem oil and sprays made out of liquid fish fertilizer (which has fatty acids and enzymes lacking in pasteurized fish emulsion), homegrown horsetail and stinging nettles (both are high in silica and help leaves fend off fungal disease).

Image

More important, he writes, apple growers need to understand how their trees grow above and below ground and what kind of soil they need: the woodsy, fungal-dominated kind found at a forest’s edge, rather than nitrogen-rich garden soil.

He also talks about how to prune and how to mulch with ramial wood chips, the tender branches pruned in late winter that can be allowed to decompose wherever they fall.

And he suggests herbs to grow beneath the trees, like comfrey, which is rich in calcium and draws minerals from subsoil. Also, its flowers attract native bees, to pollinate the apple blossoms.

To encourage those bees to stay, Mr. Phillips makes nests out of pieces of septic pipe. Native mason bees and bumblebees, he said, are more efficient at pollinating than European bees, which are also scarce these days. “Honeybees are like bankers,” he said. “They work 9 to 5, and only when it’s 60 degrees. Bumblebees and mason bees work from first light until dark, and pollinate all the female parts of a flower, so all the seeds take.”

If it sounds complex, it is. But don’t worry, Mr. Phillips says, smiling angelically. If you plant a tree, you will get apples in seven years or so. (Impatient gardeners need not apply.)

“But that’s good,” he said. “As the tree is growing, you’re learning.” A beginner, he suggests, could plant three trees in a triangle, 20 feet apart. Dwarf trees need less space, but have weaker root systems and are more subject to disease.

So if you have a tiny backyard, consider collaborating with your neighbors. Or support a community orchard, he said, which is usually run by “the guy who gets so excited, he says, ‘Honey, I’m going to plant 10 more trees.’ ”

MR. PHILLIPS’S love affair with apples began soon after he started his first job as a civil engineer, managing construction outside Washington, D.C.

“I would watch the sun rise over four-lane bumper-to-bumper traffic, thinking, ‘There’s probably something out there that would make me happier,’ ” he said. “I retired from civil engineering at 23.”

Soon, he had signed on as a carpenter for a community in southern New Hampshire devoted to helping abused and abandoned children. There, he helped build post-and-beam solar houses and dug up old tennis courts (the property had once been a summer camp), turning them into gardens.

He also planted apple trees. “And I realized, ‘I love this,’ ” he said.

In the fall, he took time off to pick apples in southern Vermont. Then one spring, he headed to New Zealand, where it was fall, to pick apples.

“I picked Cox’s Orange Pippins, looking out over the Tasman Sea,” he said. “They taste pretty good right off the tree.”

By the time he returned, he was determined to grow apples organically. He had fallen in love with a social worker, Nancy Spannenberg, at the children’s community, and the two moved north in the late 1980s, eventually settling here and raising a daughter, Grace, now 16, along with herbs, vegetables and, of course, apples.

Their farmstead, which harks back to the 1880s, had a remnant of an earlier orchard: a century-old tree that bears Duchess of Oldenburg apples, a chain embedded in its trunk to keep it from breaking apart.

“It’s one of four apple varieties brought to American shores in the 1830s from Russia,” Mr. Phillips said. “They were looking for apples that were very hardy to this climate, that a homestead family could depend on for a crop.”

It’s also one of his favorite apples, a tart summer variety that makes a great pie and applesauce.

“It has a reddish blush on green, with some stripes, and then the green turns yellow,” he said, with a lover’s attention to detail.

But then, Mr. Phillips loves all his apples. And there are 80 varieties thriving here.

One wild apple tree was 20 years old when he got here, and he could tell it had a healthy root system. So he started grafting varieties to its branches. Now, 24 varieties ripen on its stems.

When children ask that, Mr. Phillips answers like this: “I say, ‘Kayle, if I cut off your thumb and put it on Ben’s thumb over here, then everything growing out of Ben’s thumb would be Kayle.’ ”

So is his description of his nemesis, the round-headed apple-tree borer.

“The female crawls down the trunk to the soil line and makes as many as seven slits in a little baby tree the size of my thumb and lays an egg,” he said. “That grub stays in there for two years, eating the cambium and sap wood, then extends down to the roots. If just one survives, that tree’s dead.”

You could go after the larvae with a wire, but if there are seven, you’ll carve up the tree.

Instead, in July and August, when the females lay their eggs, Mr. Phillips sprays the trunk with a neem oil solution that contains a compound called azadirachtin, which suppresses molting. If an insect can’t shed its skin as it grows, it dies. Neem oil also deters insects from feeding and laying eggs.

Chemical companies have isolated the compound to manufacture patented products like Neemix or Ecozin. But those extractions “lose the other constituents of the plant,” Mr. Phillips said.


Goldrush Apple Tree

  • SKU
  • Option
  • Ships in
  • Price
  • 65758
  • Standard 2-4' tree
  • Spring
  • Out of Stock
  • 62703
  • Standard Deluxe
  • Spring
  • Out of Stock
  • 62704
  • Reachables ® 2-4' tree
  • Spring
  • Out of Stock
  • 62706
  • Reachables ® Deluxe
  • Spring
  • Out of Stock
  • One of the best keeping apples
  • Stores till June in the refrigerator
  • Crisp texture and sweet-tart flavor get better with time
  • Good disease resistance to scab, fire blight and mildew
  • Ripens late season
  • Available in Reachables ® size
One of the best keeping apples ever! Keeps in the refrigerator until June of the year following harvest. Retains crisp texture and, like fine wine, Goldrush's flavor gets even better with time. The large, late ripening apples are exceptional for fresh eating—and out of this world for pies and cider! Quick to bear, often in its second year. Good disease resistance to scab, fire blight and mildew. A real winner! Best pollinators are Liberty, Fuji, Gala, Enterprise, Sundance and Pixie Crunch. Zones 5-8. PP9392.

Now available in Reachables size! A Reachables tree produces full-sized fruits, but on a smaller tree. That makes it easier to fit into your garden, orchard—or even a container. Thanks to state-of-the-art rootstock technology, these trees stay manageable allowing one person to prune, spray, net and harvest the tree—all while standing on the ground. No ladders required! Note: Because their full-sized fruits grow on smaller trees, Reachables require a tree support.

Why buy a Deluxe package -Deluxe fruit trees include 2 oz. of Fruit-Boost™ Pelletized Calcium to enhance fruit quality, 12 oz. bag of Fruit Tree Food Starter Formula, easy-to-use tree ties (see video below), a premium tree guard to protect the trunk from gnawing pests, mowers and weed trimmers, and a copy of Backyard Horticulture for Fun and Profit—How to Make $10,000 in Your Spare Time.

NOTE: We are unable to ship our trees to PO Boxes at this time.

Videos

Videos

We have received your request. You will be notified when this product is in stock.

We have received your request. You will be notified when this product is in stock.

We have received your request. You will be notified when this product is in stock.

We have received your request. You will be notified when this product is in stock.

Product Details

Product Details

  • Botanical Name: Malus domestica 'Goldrush' PP9392
  • Height: Standard: 20-22 feet. Reachables: 6-8 feet. Reachables tree heights will vary some based on location, soil, light, temperature, and other environmental factors.
  • Spacing: Standard: 20-30 feet. Reachables: 6-10 feet.
  • Depth: Locate the planting depth indicator, the marked line above the tree's root system.
  • Spread: Standard: 16-20 feet
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Pollinator: Liberty, Fuji, Gala, Enterprise, Sundance, Pixie Crunch.
  • Yield: Standard: Approximately 5-10 bushels at maturity. Reachables: 3/4 - 1 bushel. Bears fruit in 3-4 years.
  • Size: Standard 2-4 Ft
  • Blooms: Mid Spring
  • Fruit: Yellow fruit with crisp texture and excellent flavor.
  • Zone: 5-8
  • Form: Fruit Tree, Fruit, Apple, Standard Apple Tree, Reachables Apple Tree
  • Flower Form: White flowers.
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Pruning: Prune in late winter/early spring, while trees are still dormant. There are normally two goals when pruning an apple tree: 1. Initially, on young trees, to encourage a strong, solid framework. 2. On mature trees to maintain shape, maximize sun exposure and encourage fruit production. You will also want to remove any suckers coming from the rootstock. Unwanted shoots and suckers can be removed at any time. Also remove any crossed, crowded or inward-growing limbs in late winter or very early sprin
  • Foliage: Green, broad at stem end, tapers to a point, saw-edged, deciduous.
  • Botanical Name: Malus domestica 'Goldrush' PP9392
  • Height: Standard: 20-22 feet. Reachables: 6-8 feet. Reachables tree heights will vary some based on location, soil, light, temperature, and other environmental factors.
  • Spacing: Standard: 20-30 feet. Reachables: 6-10 feet.
  • Depth: Locate the planting depth indicator, the marked line above the tree's root system.
  • Spread: Standard: 16-20 feet
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Pollinator: Liberty, Fuji, Gala, Enterprise, Sundance, Pixie Crunch.
  • Yield: Standard: Approximately 5-10 bushels at maturity. Reachables: 3/4 - 1 bushel. Bears fruit in 3-4 years.
  • Size: Standard Deluxe
  • Blooms: Mid Spring
  • Fruit: Yellow fruit with crisp texture and excellent flavor.
  • Zone: 5-8
  • Form: Fruit Tree, Fruit, Apple, Standard Apple Tree, Reachables Apple Tree
  • Flower Form: White flowers.
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Pruning: Prune in late winter/early spring, while trees are still dormant. There are normally two goals when pruning an apple tree: 1. Initially, on young trees, to encourage a strong, solid framework. 2. On mature trees to maintain shape, maximize sun exposure and encourage fruit production. You will also want to remove any suckers coming from the rootstock. Unwanted shoots and suckers can be removed at any time. Also remove any crossed, crowded or inward-growing limbs in late winter or very early sprin
  • Foliage: Green, broad at stem end, tapers to a point, saw-edged, deciduous.
  • Botanical Name: Malus domestica 'Goldrush' PP9392
  • Height: Standard: 20-22 feet. Reachables: 6-8 feet. Reachables tree heights will vary some based on location, soil, light, temperature, and other environmental factors.
  • Spacing: Standard: 20-30 feet. Reachables: 6-10 feet.
  • Depth: Locate the planting depth indicator, the marked line above the tree's root system.
  • Spread: Standard: 16-20 feet
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Pollinator: Liberty, Fuji, Gala, Enterprise, Sundance, Pixie Crunch.
  • Yield: Standard: Approximately 5-10 bushels at maturity. Reachables: 3/4 - 1 bushel. Bears fruit in 3-4 years.
  • Size: Reachables [R] 2-4 Ft
  • Blooms: Mid Spring
  • Fruit: Yellow fruit with crisp texture and excellent flavor.
  • Zone: 5-8
  • Form: Fruit Tree, Fruit, Apple, Standard Apple Tree, Reachables Apple Tree
  • Flower Form: White flowers.
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Pruning: Prune in late winter/early spring, while trees are still dormant. There are normally two goals when pruning an apple tree: 1. Initially, on young trees, to encourage a strong, solid framework. 2. On mature trees to maintain shape, maximize sun exposure and encourage fruit production. You will also want to remove any suckers coming from the rootstock. Unwanted shoots and suckers can be removed at any time. Also remove any crossed, crowded or inward-growing limbs in late winter or very early sprin
  • Foliage: Green, broad at stem end, tapers to a point, saw-edged, deciduous.
  • Botanical Name: Malus domestica 'Goldrush' PP9392
  • Height: Standard: 20-22 feet. Reachables: 6-8 feet. Reachables tree heights will vary some based on location, soil, light, temperature, and other environmental factors.
  • Spacing: Standard: 20-30 feet. Reachables: 6-10 feet.
  • Depth: Locate the planting depth indicator, the marked line above the tree's root system.
  • Spread: Standard: 16-20 feet
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Pollinator: Liberty, Fuji, Gala, Enterprise, Sundance, Pixie Crunch.
  • Yield: Standard: Approximately 5-10 bushels at maturity. Reachables: 3/4 - 1 bushel. Bears fruit in 3-4 years.
  • Size: Reachables [R] Deluxe
  • Blooms: Mid Spring
  • Fruit: Yellow fruit with crisp texture and excellent flavor.
  • Zone: 5-8
  • Form: Fruit Tree, Fruit, Apple, Standard Apple Tree, Reachables Apple Tree
  • Flower Form: White flowers.
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Pruning: Prune in late winter/early spring, while trees are still dormant. There are normally two goals when pruning an apple tree: 1. Initially, on young trees, to encourage a strong, solid framework. 2. On mature trees to maintain shape, maximize sun exposure and encourage fruit production. You will also want to remove any suckers coming from the rootstock. Unwanted shoots and suckers can be removed at any time. Also remove any crossed, crowded or inward-growing limbs in late winter or very early sprin
  • Foliage: Green, broad at stem end, tapers to a point, saw-edged, deciduous.

You may also like

Reviews

Reviews

Question & Answers

Question & Answers

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule
ZONE Fruit Trees
1A-4A 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
4B 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
5A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
5B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
7A 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
7B 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
8A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
9A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
10A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
Last Order Date 1A-7B: 5/31/21
8A-10B: 5/10/21

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule
ZONE Fruit Trees
1A-4A 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
4B 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
5A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
5B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
7A 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
7B 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
8A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
9A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
10A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
Last Order Date 1A-7B: 5/31/21
8A-10B: 5/10/21

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule
ZONE Fruit Trees
1A-4A 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
4B 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
5A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
5B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
7A 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
7B 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
8A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
9A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
10A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
Last Order Date 1A-7B: 5/31/21
8A-10B: 5/10/21

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule
ZONE Fruit Trees
1A-4A 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
4B 3/29/21 - 6/4/21
5A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
5B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6A 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
6B 3/1/21 - 6/4/21
7A 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
7B 2/8/21 - 6/4/21
8A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
9A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
10A & B 2/8/21 - 5/14/21
Last Order Date 1A-7B: 5/31/21
8A-10B: 5/10/21

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.


Watch the video: HOW TO GROW APPLE TREE IN POTS, CONTAINERS 2020


Previous Article

Information About Pineapples

Next Article

The benefits and harms of walnuts for the human body