Amaryllis Bulb Rot – What Causes Rotten Amaryllis Bulbs


By: Tonya Barnett, (Author of FRESHCUTKY)

Amaryllisplants are loved for their large, vibrantflowers. Ranging in color from white to dark red or burgundy, amaryllis bulbsare a popular choice for outdoorwarm climate gardens, or those wishing to grow the bulb indoors forforcing during the winter season. Coming in various sizes, these large bulbscan be potted into containers and grown near a sunny window. Their ease of caremakes them a popular gift for both experienced and amateur garden enthusiasts.

Amaryllis bulbs, specifically those sold for forcingduring the winter, require certain conditions for adequate growthand the production of large flowers. From planting to bloom, there are severalfactors which may impact the overall health of the plant. Like many pottedplants, diseases and issues related to fungal infections can be detrimental tothe development of the plant and may even cause it to die before it is able tobloom. Amaryllis bulb rot is one such issue.

Why are My Amaryllis Bulbs Rotting?

There are several reasons why amaryllis bulbs may begin torot. Among these causes is fungal infection. In many cases, spores are able toenter through the outer scales of the amaryllis bulb and then continue therotting process from within. Though minor infections may not impact the bloomof the plant, those that are more severe can cause the eventual collapse of theamaryllis plant.

While fungal infections are very common in these bulbs,other rot issues may stem from moisture or exposure to extreme temperatures.Bulbs that have been planted into containers or garden beds which fail to drainadequately can be a definitive cause of rotten amaryllis bulbs. This isespecially true of amaryllis varieties that are slow to sprout roots and beginthe growth process.

In addition to these factors, amaryllis bulb rot may occurwhen the bulbs have been damaged by extremely cold temperatures during storageor throughout the shipping process. In general, it is best to discard rottingamaryllis bulbs. This will help to prevent the spread of fungal infection toother plants.

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Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) flowers are so spectacular, it's hard to believe the plant is related to the humble daffodil. Potted amaryllis is prized for its colorful, lily-like flowers during the winter holiday season. Planted outdoors, some amaryllis may bloom in late spring or summer. Either way, amaryllis produces a tall, thick flower stalk that grows and blooms so quickly you can almost see it moving. Plant amaryllis outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11. In zone 8, mulch garden-grown amaryllis in winter to protect the bulbs. The plant suffers from few pests, but it may occasionally be attacked by fungus gnats.


How to Store The Amaryllis Bulb

After the Christmas or December Holiday season, I usually start my Amaryllis bulbs for indoor enjoyment. Let’s face it, it is just too busy during the last months of the year to start new plants indoors. This means once the bulb is done blooming as we head into late winter and early spring it is time to start storing the spent bulb. I like to move the bulb to a clean garden center style container with enough soil to cover the roots. I then place wood chips around the top of the bulb. The container is placed into a paper bag so it can breathe but not get wet. It is best to store the bulbs at 50*F. A humid location like in a basement is recommended as well.


How to Store Amaryllis Bulbs

Last Updated: April 19, 2020 References

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Amaryllis are known for their large, beautiful red or orange flowers that can bloom even through the winter time. They look great out in your yard or even in a pot on your windowsill. By using gardening tools you may already have at home, you can make your bulbs bloom and enjoy your amaryllis flowers for years to come.

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u00a9 2021 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.

Variation: If your bulbs are new and you haven’t planted them yet, keep them in a paper bag in a cool, dry place, like your basement or your kitchen pantry. Make sure the temperature stays above 40 °F (4 °C). [4] X Trustworthy Source EDIS Electronic database of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences's peer-reviewed articles Go to source


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